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Exhibitions

ON VIEW

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

PAST EXHIBITIONS

On View

Heroines of Abstract Expressionism and FEM

November 14, 2020 – April 25, 2021

The Mansion

Tuesday-Sunday, 11 am-4:45 pm

Advance timed ticket entry is required, and tickets may be purchased here.

Great art by women fill the Museum with two simultaneous exhibitions. Beginning with an intimate gallery of masterworks by Mary Cassatt, Georgia O’Keeffe and Camille Claudel, it moves on to a major private collection featuring the “9th Street Women” and then to some of the leading artists of our own day, including Lynda Benglis and Kara Walker, with works that are fresh out of the studio. The roster of major artists includes Louise Bourgeois, Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Mitchell, Louise Nevelson and other trailblazers of Abstract Expressionism, the most exciting movement in American art history. These highlights are all from an extraordinary private collection brought together by Richard P. Friedman and Cindy Lou Wakefield, among the world’s top collectors of Contemporary art.

Pop Prints

Selections From The Permanent Collection

Through September 12, 2021

The Manes Center

Tuesday-Friday, 1-4 pm 

Advance timed ticket entry is required, and tickets may be purchased here.

The wheel of art history was turning fast when Pop spun to the top in the Sixties, displacing Abstract Expressionism after barely a decade of dominance. After the brooding challenge of abstraction, the contrast of snappy graphics and familiar references was a relief for many, and a magnet for new audiences. High and low met in the galleries and museums, set up by such media-savvy leaders as Andy Warhol, who now forces us to think of art in the supermarket aisle where the Campbell’s soup cans still dominate the shelves, and Roy Lichtenstein, whose Foot and Hand (1964) returns to the medium of “art” printmaking the shading and even pressure of black outlines (no brush or pencil strokes) that he borrowed from the original sources, which included comic books and the cartoons found in bubble gum packages. Larry Rivers pumps the colors of the Fauves into the Mad Men icon of Joe Camel while, perhaps more subtly, Robert Rauschenberg gently lifts from newsprint the headlines and banal photographs of the day’s news (not that new a trope, if you recall the collages of Picasso and Braque, but they did not cloak them in Rauschenberg’s mist).

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